Rewiring the System


Isle Of Manx created by Finn McCool: Dromenon

Posted in Uncategorized by rewiringangel on January 10, 2009

The Dromenon origine:

The Island’s parliament is Tynwald, which dates from at least AD 979 and is said to be the oldest continuously existing parliament in the world. Tynwald is a bicameral legislature, comprising the House of Keys (directly elected by universal suffrage) and the Legislative Council (consisting of indirectly elected and ex-officio members). These two bodies meet together in joint session as Tynwald.

The three legs relate directly to the island’s motto: Quocunque Jeceris Stabit, translated as ‘Whithersoever you throw it, it will stand’. Interpretations of the motto often stress stability and robustness in the Manx character. Many schools on the island have adapted the motto to promote perseverance and hard work.

The origin of the ‘Three Legs of Man’ (as they are usually called) is explained in the Manx legend that Manannan

Variations on the Manx triskelion are still in use on the coats of arms belonging to the different branches of the ancient Norwegian noble family that ruled Mann until the thirteenth century. This particular version belongs to the Skancke branch of the Skanke family. The name stems from skank, the Norwegian version of the word ‘shank’, or ‘leg‘. The Norse royal family of Man stayed on the island for some years after the death of Magnus III and the beginning of Scottish rule. The family’s emigration only came after the a final attempt on the part of the Manx at restoring the old Sudreyar dynasty in the 1275 uprising against the Scots.

This revolt failed disastrously, ending in the deaths of hundreds of rebels, including the last Norse King of Man, Godred IV Magnuson when the Manx suffered defeat in the decisive Battle of Ronaldsway, near Castletown. When the Norse-Manx royals arrived in Norway they took service as nobles of the Norwegian king, quickly becoming knights, landlords, and clergy under the Norwegian Crown. repelled an invasion by transforming into the three legs and rolling down the hill and defeating the invaders.

Myth, legend and folklore

In Manx mythology, the island was ruled by Manannán mac Lir, a Celtic sea god, who would draw his misty cloak around the island to protect it from invaders. One of the principal theories about the origin of the name Mann is that it is named after Manannan.

In the Manx tradition of folklore, there are many stories of mythical creatures and characters. These include the Buggane, a malevolent spirit who according to legend blew the roof off St Trinian’s church in a fit of pique; the Fenodyree; the Glashtyn; and the Moddey Dhoo, a ghostly black dog who wandered the walls and corridors of Peel Castle.

The Isle of Man is also said to be home to fairies, known locally as ‘the little folk’ or ‘themselves’. There is a famous Fairy Bridge and it is said to be bad luck if one fails to wish the fairies good morning or afternoon when passing over it. Other types of fairies are the Mi’raj and the Arkan Sonney.

An old Irish story tells how Lough Neagh was formed when Ireland’s legendary giant Fionn mac CumhaillScottish rival. He missed, and the chunk of earth landed in the Irish Sea, thus creating the Isle of Man. sometimes known as Finn McCool scooped up a portion of the land and tossed it.

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