Rewiring the System


the question at the end of the physics post answered

Posted in Uncategorized by rewiringangel on August 5, 2009


Bad Mitochondria May Actually Be Good For You
//

There are currently too many topics in this group that display first. To make this topic appear first, remove this option from another topic.
There was an error processing your request. Please try again.
flag
3 messages – Collapse all –  Translate all to Translated (View all originals)

//

//

The group you are posting to is a Usenet group. Messages posted to this group will make your email address visible to anyone on the Internet.
Your reply message has not been sent.
Your post was successful

//

From:
To:
Cc:
Followup To:
Add Cc | Add Followup-to | Edit Subject
Subject:
Parijata Mackey
View profile
More options Jul 22, 4:25 pm
From: Parijata Mackey <parij@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 22 Jul 2009 16:25:06 -0700
Local: Wed, Jul 22 2009 4:25 pm
Subject: Bad Mitochondria May Actually Be Good For You

Bad mitochondria may actually be good for you

Posted by: Snowcrash on: July 22, 2009/
From:
http://biosingularity.wordpress.com/2009/07/22/bad-mitochondria-may-a…

Mice with a defective mitochondrial protein called MCLK1 produce elevated
amounts of reactive oxygen when young; that should spell disaster, yet
according to a study in this week’s JBC these mice actually age at a slower
rate and live longer than normal mice.

Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a popular theory explaining the aging
process; over time, reactive oxygen species produced by mitochondria while
they make energy slowly accumulate and begin damaging cells, including the
mitochondria. Several recent studies have begun to question this theory,
though, and to get some more direct answers, Siegfried Hekimi and colleagues
at McGill University examined the mitochondria of MCLK1-defective mice, a
strain known for its longevity, at various ages.

What they found was that in young (3 month old) MCLK1-defective mice,
mitochondria were quite energy inefficient and produced a lot of harmful
oxygen radicals; yet surprisingly, when these mice were 23 months old, their
mitochondria were working better than normal mice. So, despite the oxidative
stress, these mice experienced less deterioration than normal.

To confirm whether MCLK1-defiency could be somehow protective, the
researchers crossed MCLK1-defective mice with those lacking SOD2, a major
protein antioxidant. Normally, SOD2-defective mice accumulate cellular
damage quickly, yet when combined with MCLK1-defiency, they exhibited less
damage and oxidative stress.

In explaining this seeming paradox, Hekimi and colleagues suggest that while
MCLK1-defective mice produce more oxygen radicals from their mitochondria,
their overall inefficiency results in less energy and fewer oxygen radicals
being produced in other parts of a cell. Thus while these mice may have some
higher risks of damage while young, they accumulate less damage as they age
–a finding that seems to indicate the mitochondrial stress theory may not be
correct.

Source: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology<http://www.asbmb.org/>

Parijata Mackey
University of Chicago
parij@gmail.com
www.parijata.com

“Have patience with all yet unsolved in your heart. Try to love the
questions themselves, like locked rooms and foreign scripts. Do not now seek
the answers. They cannot yet be given because you could not yet live them —
and the point is to live everything. At the present, you need to live the
question. Perhaps you will gradually, without even noticing it, find
yourself experiencing the answer, some distant day.”

– Rainer Maria Rilke


Reply Reply to author Forward Rate this post: // Text for clearing space

You must Sign in before you can post messages.
To post a message you must first join this group.
Please update your nickname on the subscription settings page before posting.
You do not have the permission required to post.

//

caston
View profile
More options Jul 23, 2:25 am
From: caston <chris.cas@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 23 Jul 2009 02:25:15 -0700 (PDT)
Local: Thurs, Jul 23 2009 2:25 am
Subject: Re: Bad Mitochondria May Actually Be Good For You
On Jul 23, 7:25 am, Parijata Mackey <parij@gmail.com> wrote:

>  Bad mitochondria may actually be good for you
> In explaining this seeming paradox, Hekimi and colleagues suggest that while
> MCLK1-defective mice produce more oxygen radicals from their mitochondria,
> their overall inefficiency results in less energy and fewer oxygen radicals
> being produced in other parts of a cell. Thus while these mice may have some
> higher risks of damage while young, they accumulate less damage as they age
> –a finding that seems to indicate the mitochondrial stress theory may not be
> correct.
> Source: American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular
> Biology<http://www.asbmb.org/>
> —
> Parijata Mackey
> University of Chicago
> parij@gmail.comwww.parijata.com

Increased oxygen radical production may yet prove not a bug but a
feature. I’d want to compare the intracellular microbiomes and
cellular organelles of  the MCLK1-deficient mice compared to the
controls.
My theory is that these leaky free radicals is actually another weapon
of the intracellular immune system. Mitochondria get attacked by
pathogens in the cytoplasm and the only defense weapon they have are
free radicals.

The increasing levels of free radicals are not due to an error
catastrophe of increasing mutant mitochondria but rather a MAD arms
race in an increasingly hostile cytoplasm.

When the cell is free of pathogenic bacteria the mitochondria will
have sex and fuse together repairing damage and then making new
mitochondria through fission.

best regards,

Chris


Reply Reply to author Forward Rate this post: // Text for clearing space

You must Sign in before you can post messages.
To post a message you must first join this group.
Please update your nickname on the subscription settings page before posting.
You do not have the permission required to post.

//

Jim Lai
View profile
More options Jul 24, 8:40 am
From: Jim Lai <grim@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 24 Jul 2009 08:40:04 -0700 (PDT)
Local: Fri, Jul 24 2009 8:40 am
Subject: Re: Bad Mitochondria May Actually Be Good For You
Contrast this earlier report that linked inefficient mitochondira with
increased lifespan, which I’ll quote in part:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2007-12/cp-fdo112707.php

By making the skeletal muscles of mice use energy less efficiently,
researchers report in the December issue of Cell Metabolism, a
publication of Cell Press, that they have delayed the animals’ deaths
and their development of age-related diseases, including vascular
disease, obesity, and one form of cancer. Those health benefits,
driven by an increased metabolic rate, appear to come without any
direct influence on the aging process itself, according to the
researchers.

The mitochondria powering the mouse muscles were made inefficient by
increasing the activity of so-called uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP1
disrupts the transfer of electrons from food to oxygen, a process
known as mitochondrial respiration, which normally yields the energy
transport molecule ATP. Instead, the energy is lost as heat.

“When you make the mitochondria inefficient, the muscles burn more
calories,” a metabolic increase that could be at least a partial
substitute for exercise, said Clay Semenkovich of Washington
University School of Medicine in St. Louis. “There are a couple of
ways to treat obesity and related diseases,” he continued. “You can
eat less, but that’s unpopular, or you could eat what you want as
these animals did and introduce an altered physiology. It’s a
fundamentally different way of addressing the problem.”

The researchers include Allison C. Gates, Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi,
Sharon L. Chinault, Chu Feng, Jochen G. Schneider, Trey Coleman, James
P. Malone, R. Reid Townsend, Manu V. Chakravarthy, and Clay F.
Semenkovich, of the Washington University School of Medicine, St.
Louis, MO, USA.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: